Thanksgiving Post from Mr. O in 1994 | Karate International of Raleigh
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ONLY $29.50 FOR OUR
TWO WEEK QUICK START PROGRAM!

Secure your spot and get started today with our EXCLUSIVE offer!

By opting into the web form above you are providing consent for Karate International of Raleigh to send you periodic text messages. Standard rates may apply. You can reply HELP at anytime or learn more. You may opt-out anytime by replying STOP.
Poblocki Sign Company reviewed Karate International of Raleigh
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Thank you to Take Control Self Defense for a one hour virtual self defense class as part of our Women's Empowerment series at Poblocki. Very informative and empowering.

ElectriCities of NC reviewed Karate International of Raleigh
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We loved having you! Thanks for teaching our employees great methods to Take Control.

Jennifer Mazzeo-Skelson

Our family has been coming to Karate International for over 5 years now. It was the best decision we ever made for our boys. Shortly after, my husband started and all three are now black belts. Now I am taking karate, as well. KI has a great family atmosphere in a controlled environment that encourages you to want to come to class to learn and grow. No show-boating here, safety is always #1. There is an abundance of high level knowledge at the Raleigh dojo and every instructor goes above and beyond to help. There are several arts they teach. There is a reason they have been in business as long as they have. And that is because for them it's not a business but a passion and it shows in everything and everyone at KI. HIGHLY RECOMMEND!!

Randall Shirley reviewed Karate International of Raleigh
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This is The REAL DEAL---A Family type atmosphere--Extremely helpful and friendly----This Dojo is the Best of the Best---

Scott Weinberger reviewed Karate International of Raleigh
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The best family martial arts school I've ever seen. Something for everybody. The skill level really shows that they are a 40+ year school. And they have multiple martial arts, which is rare.

Richard Gillespie reviewed Karate International of Raleigh
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This is a wonderful place for my whole family. My sons 11, 9, and 6 are all on the path to Black Belt. Even their old man is giving it a try...

Evelyn Foster reviewed Karate International of Raleigh
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I can't say enough good things about Karate International. They know how to work with children in a way that they learn proper form and technique while balancing lessons in character and integrity, all without taking out the fun. Any day, you can hear giggles from the little samurai class as they keep children enthused about karate. My son comes many times each week, and never tires of coming, and looks forward to progressing.

In addition to being child-friendly, they are parent-friendly and have done everything they could to make the parent wait comfortable and productive including parent exercise equipment, coffee, a seating area to watch classes, Wi-Fi and a charging station for mobile devices. It's the little things that say to us we are valued here. We are here to stay.

Donna Weinberger Needham reviewed Karate International of Raleigh
5
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I have watched in awe as my son has become focused, disciplined, and confident during his journey to black belt. I now see him teaching and giving back to others. KI has been life-changing for him. I can’t say enough great things about this program, the instructors, and the community. If you’re thinking about starting karate, you’ve found the perfect place!

Heidi Erwin reviewed Karate International of Raleigh
5
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Every student is treated with attention and care, the staff and owners are extremely knowledgeable, patient, encouraging and hold high standards for the students. It is a delight to come and get a great workout while building character and respect through the discipline of karate. We cannot think of a better option for our middle school son!

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Thanksgiving Post from Mr. O in 1994

This Blog is a repost of an article Written by Mr. O and published in the News and Observer in 1994, when Mr. Josh was 9 years old!

Expressing love is the best way to enrich life

by Rob Olevsky – 11-27-1994

There are, in this fast paced world, two simple things that I never seem to see enough of; smiles and affection.  So, at this special time of year, please spread both among your friends and family.

As your mind wanders after that big Thanksgiving dinner, ponder your lifestyle (it’s never too late to make modifications), decide to spread more smiles, and before everyone leaves, hold hands and truly give thanks.  Many of you already have what is important:  family, love and health.  All those “things” that you think you have to possess, or provide, soon pale when held up to comparison.

Is it true that our “lifestyle” can determine how we have handled the past, dealt with present and look at the future?  I think so, and as I’ve gotten older, lived this life, looked for its rewards and found some of its treasures, my “lifestyle” has changed, as I have changed.  For example, the older I get, the more I enjoy teaching new parents about my early morning encounters with my second child.

Back in 1987, when my son was two and before it was cool to be a “House Dad,” my wife went to work earlier than me.  Consequently, I spent mornings at home with my son.  We slept late and did “guy things” like wrestling and exploring the woods behind the house.  We had breakfast together and went to the corner store to get my morning Pepsi.  I will always cherish the time I spent with him, as he was my first child.

However, by the time my second child arrived, with some eight years between them, I had learned a little more about myself and happiness.  I now tell those new parents about how I would get up, practically before sunrise, to sneak into my daughter’s room (she was a year old when I started) and sit in the rocker with the paper, waiting for her to open her eyes, to see me waiting for her.  My reward would be that “bigger than life” stretch, morning smile, and hug that would fill any Daddy’s heart.  Every night as I retire exhausted from the day, my heart reminds me of our early morning agenda, an encounter with a smile just before sunrise.

It is not so much that I teach others, but actually I show others examples of what I feel is important, so that a younger generation might have other moral sign posts, besides the negative ones, on the nightly news.  Many of the values that I’ve kept from my upbringing did not come from the lectures or discipline of my youth.  Instead my values were learned by example, based on what I saw, felt or heard from my parents and relatives.

Maybe the things we’ve lost, teach us about the things that we still have.  I really believe it is the value that we put on the things lost, that defines our character in the eyes of our peers.  Freedom, marriage, children and money are just a few examples.  The loss of any of these things, that we hold dear, can devastate an individual or contribute to how an individual lives the rest of his or her life.

As we review our past and present lives, and hope for our future, we should lay in a plan for “tolerance”.  I’m not speaking  of that Democratic buzz word for bigger government programs for all the down trodden, but instead I mean the continuing need to walk a mile in the other man’s shoe’s before you jump to a conclusion and condemn another in your mind or to others.  I throw this in hear because I want you to remember that the “little” ears are always around, and they do pickup on what we say to each other in our adult conversations.  If you ever wonder, just listen to a 3 year-old repeating your conversation, half an hour after you shared it with another adult.  We need to begin to show the “little” people that our fellow man does matter, and means more to us, than those material things that we so hard work for, but end up in the garage.  I want to challenge you to volunteer, to help someone out without seeking any reward, to teach one of your skills to another in need.  Lead by example.

Finally, as I look forward to the holidays with family and friends I make note of the main difference between my wife’s family and mine.  At this time of year as children, I celebrated Hanukkah and she celebrated Christmas.  Our children will learn about both.  One set of grandparents will give them the values learned in a traditional Jewish family and the importance of times like Hanukkah.  The other set of grandparents will teach them about the Christmas holidays they shared as a Catholic family.  Our children will be better for having lived both.

This is the time of year that we think about family and friends.  Many of us have lost some family and some friends.  This is the best day to remember to cherish the ones that are here with us.  Happy Holidays.